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Child poverty still a major issue in Sussex

Sussex Community Foundation’s new report, Sussex Uncovered 2: Bridging the Gap, released today (10 November), shows that child poverty is still shockingly high, three years after our first report in 2013. In addition, there is huge disparity between different parts of Sussex. In one area of Hastings, child poverty is running at over 75% (Baird ward, Hastings (75.5%), whereas in Lindfield, Mid Sussex, less than 1% (0.90%) of children live in poverty.

Data is drawn from the 2015 English Indices of Multiple Deprivation (IMD) which scores for very small geographical areas called LSOAs (lower layer super output areas). LSOAs have an average 1,500 people so they give a good indication of smaller pockets of deprivation. In Brighton and Hove, the LSOA with the worst child poverty was in Moulsecoomb and Bevendean, ranked 3rd most deprived in Sussex and 114th nationally.

Speakers at the launch at the American Express Community Stadium will include Imran Hussain, Director of Policy, Rights and Advocacy at the Child Poverty Action Group and Jessica Britton, Chief Operating Officer at NHS Hastings & Rother CCG and NHS Eastbourne, Hailsham and Seaford CCG.

Like the first report, Sussex Uncovered 2: Bridging the Gap shows that there is serious deprivation in Sussex, comparable to the most deprived inner city areas and that the costs of living in a rural community are substantially higher than for town-dwellers.  Around 25% of Sussex people (outside Brighton & Hove) live in rural areas and those living on low incomes there can face multiple disadvantages.

“The first Sussex Uncovered report was the first report to give a broad view of issues facing local communities across the entirety of Sussex,” says Chief Executive Kevin Richmond. “It found that Sussex is a great place to live if you can afford it. In this report, we wanted to look in a more qualitative way to uncover what is going on at the grassroots.”

Much else has changed and evolved too in the past three years. The Government’s austerity policies have started to have a real impact on the lives of people in our communities and on the charities and community groups that support them. “We asked a number of the groups that we have funded to tell us about the services they provide, how they are managing the new funding environment and their hopes for the future. Their views and experiences are reflected in this report,” says Mr Richmond.

Key findings from the new data

  • The worst child poverty in Sussex is now in Baird ward in Hastings where 75.5% of children live in poverty. In our last report, the figure for Tressell ward in Hastings was the highest (67%).
  • Hastings and Brighton & Hove still have levels of overall deprivation above the national average Hastings is the most deprived overall and ranks 20th out of 326 districts in England. It was ranked 20th last time, indicating that its relative deprivation remains unchanged.
  • The average salary of those employed in Sussex remains the lowest in the South East at £28,752. It is below both the South East and England averages. The three districts in Sussex with the highest employment incomes are Mid Sussex, Horsham and Wealden. In our last report, Chichester came third.
  • In our last report, 34 wards in Sussex were in the top 20% most deprived in England, This time, the figure is 26, indicating that the extent of ward-level deprivation has reduced relative to other areas. However, in our last report, Crawley had no wards in the top 20%. This time around, Broadfield South ward has crept in to the top 20% most deprived in England.
  • Men living in less deprived areas of Brighton & Hove will live on average over nine years longer than those in the most deprived areas. In our previous report, the difference was over ten years.
  • Sussex has the 12th highest proportion of population aged 65 and over out of 53 sub-regions in England & Wales, indicating that older people are a significant feature of Sussex. Almost 17% of the population of Rother is over 75 year olds and over (16.99%). By contrast, Crawley has the smallest proportion of population aged 75 and over at 7.09%.
  • Since the last report, homelessness figures have fluctuated across the districts with some areas seeing reductions in homelessness (eg. Brighton & Hove and Horsham) and others increases (eg. Crawley, Arun and Wealden).
  • 25% of people in Sussex (excluding Brighton & Hove) live in rural areas, much higher than the England average (17.6%) People living on low incomes in rural areas continue to face significant disadvantage, particularly related to the affordability of housing and availability of services and transport.
  • Within Sussex, eight of the wards have health deprivation levels in the top 10% in England. However, this is an improvement on the last report where there were 25 wards in the top 10%.

You can download the report here or view it online here. You can also download the full data, much of which was used in Sussex Uncovered 2, here. You can read more on the methodology use here. The chart below shows the Sussex LSOAs that fall within the top 10% in England for child poverty deprivation. It uses the Income Deprivation Affecting Children Index (IDACI).[i]

SUSSEX UNCOVERED 2: BRIDGING THE GAP – Child poverty in Sussex against national rankings

   
   
         

LSOA

Ward

Local Authority District name (2013)

Income Deprivation Affecting Children Index (IDACI) Score (rate)

National rank out of 32,844 LSOAs in England.

Hastings 005A

Baird

Hastings

75.50%

11

Hastings 005D

Tressell

Hastings

65.90%

56

Brighton and Hove 002D

Moulsecoomb and Bevendean

Brighton and Hove

61.30%

114

Hastings 004B

Ore

Hastings

50.10%

767

Hastings 011D

Central St Leonards

Hastings

49.80%

811

Brighton and Hove 008C

Hollingdean and Stanmer

Brighton and Hove

49.40%

866

Hastings 011A

Central St Leonards

Hastings

49.40%

867

Brighton and Hove 025C

East Brighton

Brighton and Hove

49.30%

882

Brighton and Hove 008A

Hollingdean and Stanmer

Brighton and Hove

48.20%

1052

Hastings 003A

Hollington

Hastings

48.10%

1068

Brighton and Hove 025E

East Brighton

Brighton and Hove

48.00%

1086

Rother 007E

Sidley

Rother

47.60%

1146

Brighton and Hove 025B

East Brighton

Brighton and Hove

47.50%

1161

Hastings 011B

Central St Leonards

Hastings

47.30%

1201

Hastings 009C

Castle

Hastings

46.80%

1285

Brighton and Hove 009C

Moulsecoomb and Bevendean

Brighton and Hove

45.60%

1503

Brighton and Hove 002C

Moulsecoomb and Bevendean

Brighton and Hove

45.00%

1614

Arun 004B

Ham

Arun

45.00%

1620

Hastings 009B

Castle

Hastings

44.80%

1661

Arun 014A

Bersted

Arun

44.30%

1780

Brighton and Hove 027E

St. Peter’s and North Laine

Brighton and Hove

43.60%

1924

Brighton and Hove 009D

Moulsecoomb and Bevendean

Brighton and Hove

43.10%

2020

Brighton and Hove 025F

Hanover and Elm Grove

Brighton and Hove

42.40%

2177

Brighton and Hove 013B

Hangleton and Knoll

Brighton and Hove

42.30%

2203

Brighton and Hove 008E

Moulsecoomb and Bevendean

Brighton and Hove

42.20%

2229

Arun 004A

Ham

Arun

42.10%

2260

Brighton and Hove 025A

East Brighton

Brighton and Hove

41.10%

2527

Hastings 007E

Tressell

Hastings

41.10%

2530

Hastings 008E

Gensing

Hastings

40.70%

2646

Chichester 008A

Chichester East

Chichester

40.50%

2713

Rother 004E

Rye

Rother

40.40%

2731

Crawley 013D

Broadfield South

Crawley

40.40%

2738

Rother 011C

Central

Rother

40.30%

2766

Hastings 011C

Central St Leonards

Hastings

40.00%

2835

Eastbourne 014C

Sovereign

Eastbourne

39.40%

3038

Eastbourne 001B

Langney

Eastbourne

39.30%

3059

Crawley 010A

Bewbush

Crawley

39.00%

3166


[i]
The IDACI is the proportion of all children aged 0-15 living in income-deprived families. Income-deprived families are defined as families that either receive Income Support or income-based Jobseekers Allowance or income-based Employment and Support Allowance or Pension Credit (Guarantee) or families not in receipt of these benefits but in receipt of Working Tax Credit or Child Tax Credit with an equivalised income (excluding housing benefit) below 60 per cent of the national median before housing costs. Shrinkage was applied to construct the Income Deprivation Affecting Children Index score.

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